Geological Survey of Norway

NGU, Senior Geologist Ron Boyd, Geological Survey of Norway (NGU). Photo: Geir Otto JohansenWorth their weight in gold
Calculations performed by NGU in 2012 valued well documented mineral deposits in Norwegian bedrock at a minimum of NOK 2500 billion. Metals account for more than half of this. The “in situ” value of well-documented, metal deposits, using prices from April 2012, is NOK 1388 billion. In addition, geologists believe that sofar unidentified ore bodies can be found at depth beneath ore provinces that were abandoned decades ago, such as those at Røros and Løkken in central Norway, and in large, so far little investigated deposits, such as Raitevarre and Gallujav’ri in Finnmark.

Norwegian authorities have wanted a more precise evaluation of the resources in Norwegian bedrock for a long time. However, the values that can be generated by future mining depend upon the conditions for working the deposits, the mineraldressing technology used and future price fluctuations.

A review of the metals shows that iron, irontitanium and titanium ores alone have a value of NOK 1224 billion, with the current Sydvaranger and Rana mines as the most valuable deposits. Added to these are deposits of copper, coppergold, zinc, lead and nickel, as well as a group of special metals.

Similar evaluations of the large Norwegian resources of industrial minerals, such as marble, olivine and quartz, show an insitu value of NOK 400 billion. Norway meets some 40 per cent of the world demand for olivine, and is the largest European producer of milled calcite marble.

Norway has deposits of building raw materials, such as sand, gravel and aggregates, worth nearly NOK 500 billion. The total reserves and resources are estimated at 8300 million tonnes and are expected to last well over 100 years. Dimension stone products, like larvikite and flagstone, are valued at NOK 250 billion and the documented coal reserves on Svalbard at NOK 23 billion.

• URBAN MINING:
When the ore has been extracted, it is processed to produce metals which, in many cases, such as iron in ships or railway tracks, or copper in electrical cables, form infrastructure which will be in use for many decades before the metals become available for recycling. Modern electronic equipment contains high concentrations of a range of special metals, which can be recycled, given suitable incentives for collection of old models and the technology for recovering the important metals from these.

• PURE QUARTZ:
Quartz is an important industrial mineral, used in many applications, including memory chips, solar panels and smart phones, via glass and cosmetics, to silicon. NGU maps quartz deposits in Norway and is a world leader in precise chemical analysis of trace elements in quartz. In Norway, 148 people are now employed in quarrying quartz and quartzite at seven locations, giving a total turnover of NOK 400 million.

• GETTING A GRIP ON GRAPHITE:
Helicopterborne geophysical measurements are an essential for revealing underground deposits of graphite. The EU and the USA characterise graphite as a critical mineral which in view of increasing demand for high technology applications and the limited number of deposits, particularly of highquality flake graphite.

 

The Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) manages information on Norwegian geology, about bedrock, unconsolidated deposits, mineral resources and groundwater. NGU maps the whole country to reveal both hazards and resources – for the benefit of industry, local authorities and the country’s inhabitants.

The Norwegian Government has allocated additional funds of NOK 25 mill./year for the period 20112014 to NGU and the program Mineral resources in North Norway (MINN). The program includes highresolution geophysics, followup geology, till geochemistry and spinoff projects. The goals are higher exploration activity, new discoveries, an improved geological knowledgebase, evaluation of the mineral potential and a better basis for areal planning. A similar program will commence in South Norway in 2013.

NGU logoThe Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) manages information on Norwegian geology, about bedrock, unconsolidated deposits, mineral resources and groundwater. NGU maps the whole country to reveal both hazards and resources – for the benefit of industry, local authorities and the country’s inhabitants.

 

The Norwegian Government has allocated additional funds of NOK 25 mill./year for the period 20112014 to NGU and the program Mineral resources in North Norway (MINN). The program includes highresolution geophysics, followup geology, till geochemistry and spinoff projects. The goals are higher exploration activity, new discoveries, an improved geological knowledgebase, evaluation of the mineral potential and a better basis for areal planning. A similar program will commence in South Norway in 2013.

Geological Survey of Norway
PO Box 6315 Sluppen, 7491 Trondheim, Norway Visiting address: Leiv Eirikssons road 39
+47 73 90 40 11
http://www.ngu.no